“The sun blazed a brilliant arc in space and I saw the moon spinning swiftly from new to full. The hands on the dials whirled round faster and faster and the sun belt swayed from solstice to solstice.”

I’m always on the quest for novel and realistic ideas for ‘The Time Machine’ album artwork and discovered this ‘Solargraph’ of the Brunel’s famous suspension bridge, Clifton, Bristol by Justin Quinnell. The picture was taken over a six month period from December 17th 2007 to June 21st 2008 using a simple pin-hole camera made from just an empty aluminium drinks can punctured with a pin-prick sized hole for the aperture and a sheet of photographic paper. Justin Quinnell strapped the camera to a telephone pole, where it overlooked the Gorge and recorded the winter and summer solstices—the lowest arc shows the path of the sun on the first day of exposure on the winter solstice, while the top arcs were show the sun’s path in mid-summer. The gaps and dark patches in the arcs of light are the result of overcast days where the sun could not to penetrate through the cloud. To me this stunning and errie image really does give a sense of how the sun and earth move with the passage of time.

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